Debunking Six Myths about Real Estate Gifts

By Dennis Bidwell
June 2014

Myth #1: If a property owner is offering a piece of real estate as a gift, there must be something wrong with it. Most of the time this is simply not true. These days property owners are exploring giving away perfectly fine pieces of real estate because: 1) they have grown weary of continuing to own and manage a property — often a second or third residential property — they no longer use; 2) they are wary of marketing the property themselves; 3) they like the idea of making a wonderful gift while retaining their cash; 4) they can use the substantial charitable contribution deductions triggered by such a gift, and they like avoiding or reducing the capital gains taxes that might have been payable in the case of a sale.

Non-profits that have ramped up their real estate gift activity have grown very good at quickly deflecting the problematic gift offerings, and spending their time instead on the promising real estate gift possibilities. Also, charities that actively pursue real estate gifts – through marketing and by initiating conversations with prospects – tend to see a much higher quality of property offered up than those who don’t market and see only the occasional, often problematic, property that is sometimes being shopped around.

Myth #2: The staff time and upfront expenses of evaluating and structuring a possible real estate gift just isn’t worth it. In the 2009 IRS report on non-cash charitable gifts the average real estate donation for donors 65 and older (the vast majority of real estate donors) was reported as $585,000. Yes, real estate gifts can be time-consuming and require some investment in due diligence investigations. And yes, not every gift explored makes it across the finish line. But, I would argue, the magnitude of real estate gifts more than justifies an investment in ramping up a carefully thought-out real estate gift effort.

Myth #3: Most gifts of real estate are deferred in some way, meaning we won’t have cash to use for many years. In fact, surveys show that more real estate gifts these days are given outright than through life income arrangements or subject to retained life estates. Outright gifts are often liquidated and fully useable by the charity in a matter of months.

Myth #4: Most property offered as a gift has a mortgage on it. This is not true. The vast majority of property offered as a gift of some sort is offered by donors over 65 years of age. And we know (from the Statistical Abstract of the U.S.) that 83% of the real estate owned by folks 65 and older is debt-free. In situations where a property is encumbered with a mortgage, there are often work-arounds making it possible to complete the gift nonetheless.

Myth #5: Property owners are resistant to having development officers talk to them about their real estate holdings. To the contrary, it is my experience that many aging owners of property welcome fresh new ideas about how they might dispose of real estate that is weighing on their minds. When a non-profit representative presents the outright gift possibility, or life income arrangements, or a retained life estate as a possible approach to a dilemma, the property owner often welcomes the introduction of new possible solutions. Whether a gift results from such conversations or not, it is my experience that the prospect usually appreciates the suggestions.

Myth #6: You should never accept real estate as the asset funding a Charitable Gift Annuity. The traditional reluctance to fund CGAs with real estate is gradually giving way to the realization that many property owners want to convert “non-performing” real estate assets into steady supplemental retirement income, wanting to lock in a return (as opposed to being exposed to the market variability of a real estate-funded Charitable Remainder Trust.) This transition is aided by the availability of various proven techniques for avoiding the liquidity risk associated with real estate-funded CGAs. Among these techniques: marketing of the property prior to the charity taking title; deferring the CGA one or more years, to allow ample marketing time; using a “charitable put option” to identify a qualified buyer prior to issuing the CGA contract; and making downward adjustments to the CGA payout rate to reflect the estimated holding costs and other expenses of working through the CGA arrangement.

Real Estate Gift Trends – Survey Results, 2013

by Dennis Bidwell
August 2013

1.  Trends in real estate gift activity in recent years

About 17% of respondents reported an increase in real estate gifts in recent years, while 83% reported receiving about the same number of real estate gifts. No respondents reported a decline in real estate giving.

Commentary: As gifts of cash and securities were hard to come by during the recession, development shops increasingly turned their attention to attracting other assets, most notably real estate. Now that the economy is coming back to life, and development activity is picking up, those same development shops – having acquired a greater comfort level with real estate gifts – continue to pursue the considerable opportunity represented by real estate assets.

2.  Sources of real estate gifts

By far and away the most effective way of attracting real estate gifts, according to survey respondents, was “conversations initiated by our organization’s gift officers.” Complete responses:

Conversations initiated by our gift officers……..73% have attracted gifts this way
Referrals from professional advisors……………27% have attracted gifts this way
Responses to information on our website……..9% have attracted gifts this way
Responses to mailings…………………………..9% have attracted gifts this way

Commentary: This tracks completely with my experience in the field, where I find that the non-profits enjoying consistent success with real estate gifts tend to train their gift officers to engage in conversations with their donors about their real estate holdings, knowing they have expertise backing them up if a real estate gift opportunity surfaces.

3.  What motivates real estate donors?

This survey showed the same results as every survey where I’ve asked this question. A desire to be unburdened from the hassles and expenses of real estate as one ages ranks very close in importance to the other major motivators: desire to support the mission of the organization, and the tax benefits of giving. Complete results:

Desire to support the good work of our organization……75% of respondents
Desire to use the tax benefits resulting from a gift……..75% of respondents
Desire to be unburdened from the hassles and
     expenses of continued ownership………………………..58% of respondents
Desire to generate life income with the gift…………………33% of respondents

Commentary: Organizations that attract good real estate gifts increasingly use a marketing message that appeals to aging property owners looking to get out from under the responsibilities of ownership with as little effort as possible.

4.  In what form are real estate gifts most often coming to you?

Results:

Bequests……………………..64% of respondents
Outright gifts…………………45% of respondents
Retained life estate gifts……36% of respondents
Life income gifts……………..27% of respondents
Fractional interest gifts……..9% of respondents

Commentary: Notable here is the frequency of outright gifts, which tracks with my experience. I find that too often gift officers — especially gift planning officers – make an assumption that the donor will want to give away something less than the whole property, and move right on to discussions of charitable remainder trusts, etc. In fact, many, many donors have the capacity and the motivation to give away properties outright. Also notable is the frequency with which retained life estate gifts are reported. I have always thought such gift structures were way underutilized in relation to the situations where they were appropriate.

5.  What types of property are most frequently being gifted?

Results:

Vacation home……………………………..60% of respondents
Investment/rental residential property……50% of respondents
Primary home………………………………40% of respondents
Commercial property………………………20% of respondents
Farm or ranch………………………………10% of respondents
Industrial property………………………….10% of respondents

Commentary: No surprises here. Vacation homes and other non-primary residential properties are almost always the most promising target for development officers in search of real estate gifts.

Conclusion

Very few good real estate gifts just walk in the door of development offices. The good ones come as a result of a purposeful plan: clarity in gift acceptance policies and procedures, smart and targeted marketing, training gift officers (and others) to initiate real estate conversations with donors, offering a large menu of gift structure options, and having access to the expertise to tailor real estate gift solutions to the particular situations of motivated property owners.

Debunking Six Myths about Real Estate Gifts

by Dennis Bidwell
November 2012

Myth #1: If a property owner is offering a piece of real estate as a gift, there must be something wrong with it.  Most of the time this is simply not true. These days property owners are exploring giving away perfectly fine pieces of real estate because: 1) they have grown weary of continuing to own and manage a property — often a vacation home — they no longer use; 2) they are wary of marketing the property themselves; 3) they like the idea of making a wonderful gift while retaining their cash; 4) they can use the substantial charitable contribution deductions triggered by such a gift, and then like avoiding  or reducing the capital gains taxes that might have been payable in the case of a sale.

Non-profits that have ramped up their real estate gift activity have grown very good at quickly deflecting the problematic gift offerings, and spending their time instead on the promising real estate gift possibilities. Also, charities that actively pursue real estate gifts – through marketing and by initiating conversations with prospects – tend to see a much high quality of property offered up than those who don’t market and see only the occasional, often problematic, property that is sometimes being shopped around.

Myth #2: The staff time and upfront expenses of evaluating and structuring a possible real estate gift just isn’t worth it. In the latest IRS report on non-cash charitable gifts (2009), the average real estate donation for donors 65 and older (the bulk of real estate donors) was reported as $585,000. Yes, real estate gifts can be time-consuming and require some investment in due diligence investigations. And yes, not every gift explored makes it across the finish line. But, I would argue, the magnitude of real estate gifts more than justifies an investment in ramping up a carefully thought-out real estate gift effort.

Myth #3: Most gifts of real estate are deferred in some way, meaning we won’t have cash to use for many years.  In fact, surveys show that more real estate gifts these days are given outright than through life income arrangements or subject to retained life estates. Outright gifts are often liquidated and fully useable by the charity in a matter of months.

Myth #4: Most property offered as a gift has a mortgage on it.  This is not true. The vast majority of property offered as a gift of some sort is offered by donors over 65 years of age. And we know (from the Statistical Abstract of the U.S.) that 83% of the real estate owned by folks 65 and older is debt-free.  In situations where a property is encumbered with a mortgage, there are often work-arounds making it possible to complete the gift nonetheless.

Myth #5: Property owners are resistant to having development officers talk to them about their real estate holdings. To the contrary, it is my experience that many aging owners of property welcome fresh new ideas about how they might dispose of real estate that is weighing on their minds. When a non-profit representative presents the outright gift possibility, or life income arrangements, or a retained life estate as a possible approach to a dilemma, the property owner often welcomes the introduction of new possible solutions. Whether a gift results from such conversations or not, it is my experience that the prospect usually appreciates the suggestions.

Myth #6: You should never accept real estate as the asset funding a Charitable Gift Annuity. The traditional reluctance to fund CGAs with real estate is gradually giving way to the realization that many property owners want to convert “non-performing” real estate assets into supplemental retirement income, but would only do it if they could lock in a return (as opposed to being exposed to the market variability of a real estate-funded Charitable Remainder Trust.) This transition is aided by the availability of various proven techniques for avoiding the liquidity risk associated with real estate-funded CGAs. Among these techniques: marketing of the property prior to the charity taking title; deferring the CGA one or more years, to allow ample marketing time; using a “charitable put option” to identify a qualified buyer prior to issuing the CGA contract; and making downward adjustments to the CGA payout rate to reflect the estimated holding costs and other expenses of working through the CGA arrangement.

Case Study: Outright Gift of Florida Condo Funds Bryn Mawr Scholarships

by Dennis Bidwell
November 2012

Take-aways from this gift scenario:

  1. Many donors have the capacity to make outright gifts of real estate, which can be converted to cash and put to use in a very short period of time.  For this reason real estate gifts are being pursued as often by major gift officers and principal gift officers as planned gift officers.
  2. A condominium association will often be quite cooperative in facilitating the gift and resale of a condominium property.
  3. Florida properties owned by Northeast residents can make wonderful gifts. Many institutions have generated real estate gifts by discussing the vacation homes, in Florida and other states, owned by their aging alums.

In the fall of 2010 a Bryn Mawr major gifts officer was visiting an alumna — a 70-year old successful New York judge and lawyer – who mentioned in casual conversation that she was no longer using her Broward County, Florida seaside condominium.  The gift officer raised the possibility of gifting the property. Because the grateful alum was hoping to make a significant gift to the College, she liked the idea, particularly if the donation could happen by year-end. She said “I had always hoped to make a substantial contribution to Bryn Mawr and express my gratitude for the excellent education that contributed to the professional success I have achieved.” She was very much aware of recent declines in the Florida condominium market, but trusted Bryn Mawr to sell the property at the best price attainable given current market conditions.

A team was quickly assembled: an attorney to arrange a title search and handle conveyances, a broker to help determine market value and to implement a marketing strategy, and a building inspector.  No problems with title, marketability or building conditions emerged from these due diligence inspections. College officials agreed to accept the property gift, but couldn’t guarantee that the gift would be completed by year-end.

Meanwhile, the property owner commissioned her own appraisal, to substantiate the charitable deduction she expected to take on her current year’s tax return. She also facilitated discussions with representatives of the condominium association, whose approval was required both for the donation to the College, and for the College’s sale to a new owner.

Once the condo association’s approval was in hand, the property was deeded over to the College, in December, and the donor’s IRS Form 8283 was completed by her appraiser and CPA, and signed off on by the College. The College assumed responsibility for property taxes, condo fees, and for looking after the property.

Marketing of the property began immediately, with an initial emphasis on other owners within the seaside building.  After several months, mailings and print advertising were used to generate additional interest in the property, which sold in April of 2011.

The donor is thrilled that her gift could be put to work immediately funding scholarships.  She said: “During challenging economic times, students will be able to complete their education uninterrupted and unburdened.  Making this gift gives me great satisfaction, knowing that I am extending the Bryn Mawr experience to future generations of young women.”

Real Estate Gifts: A Report from Practitioners in the Trenches

Real Estate Gifts – A Report from Practitioners in the Trenches

As real estate gift activity continues to increase – especially at institutions actively promoting their interest in real estate gifts – more and more professionals are concentrating on the growing field of real estate gift planning.  In my work, I often confer with colleagues specializing in this discipline.

This issue of my newsletter is entirely devoted to recent trends in the real estate gift arena, based on my experience working with a range of clients, and on my conversations with three trusted colleagues: Chase Magnuson,  Director of Planned Giving-Real Estate at George Washington University; Harry Estroff, Real Estate Gift Manager at The Nature Conservancy; and Jerry McCarter, Professional Advisor Relations Officer at the Minnesota Real Estate Foundation.

Overall real estate gift trends

Among organizations with which I’m working, real estate gift activity is clearly up at institutions that have decided they want to be more proactive in making real estate gifts happen, e.g. marketing, initiating conversation with promising real estate gift prospects, gift officer training, etc.  For organizations that aren’t specifically promoting their interest in real estate gifts, it is my experience that they generally continue to receive the occasional inquiry at about the same rate as in previous years.

Chase reports real estate gift activity at GWU has increased dramatically in recent years, which of course coincides with the time period that GWU decided to invest in a dedicated staffer to pursue real estate gifts.  Jerry reports that the Minnesota Real Estate Foundation completed 15 gifts in 2010, compared to 5 in 2009.  He reports new real estate gift prospects are emerging at the rate of two to three per month.  Harry reports that The Nature Conservancy’s overall number of real estate gifts has declined in the last two years, but that the average gift size has increased.

The most frequent real estate gift structures

My experience is that the most dramatic increase in real estate gift activity is in the area of outright gifts, followed by charitable gift annuities funded with real estate.

At The Nature Conservancy, the trend has been fewer life income gifts and more outright gifts and retained life estates.  The Minnesota Real Estate Foundation also reports outright gifts as the most popular gift type, with numerous inquiries about Charitable Remainder Trusts. GWU reports continued strong interest in both CRTs and CGAs as ways to provide income streams to donors.

What is motivating the real estate donor these days?

We are all in agreement that most donors of real estate these days are motivated by a desire to rid themselves of the headaches of owning and managing property they no longer use.  Generally, charitable intent is equally important.  The trend is that use of tax deductions, and desire for an income stream, are less a part of the motivation than they might have been in earlier years.

I have found that the most successful marketing efforts explicitly appeal to older property owners who may be facing decisions about what to do with seldom-used property that is now more of a burden than it is enjoyable.

Who are these donors, and what properties are they giving away?

The most common real estate gift scenario for the Minnesota Real Estate Foundation is the over-60 donor looking to make a gift of a debt-free vacation property or raw land.  The Nature Conservancy has seen a marked increase in inquiries from donors without a history of supporting the organization who are challenged by the difficulties presented by current market conditions.  For George Washington University, a common fact pattern is folks in the 70 to 85 range looking to dispose of a residential property in order to get rid of management headaches and produce a life time income.

My own experience is that the most common real estate donor profile is an over-70 individual or couple, with multiple properties scattered geographically, looking for help in disposing of a second home, who often times have not previously shown up on the radar screen of the non-profit they wind up giving their property to.  Also, we know from the most recently-available IRS data (2007) that the average size of reported real estate gifts for donors over 65 (the vast majority of such donors) was $787,000.

How do real estate gifts find their way to you?

The Minnesota Real Estate Foundation has been especially successful cultivating relationships with financial advisors, attorneys and CPAs who are their best referral sources. The Foundation’s partner organizations, armed with marketing material from the Foundation, also produce a significant number of referrals.

George Washington University has had considerable success training its major gift officers to initiate conversations with donor prospects identified by a prospect research team focusing on owners of multiple pieces of real estate. Similarly, The Nature Conservancy benefits from their army of well-trained field fundraisers exploring the full range of assets, including real estate, with their donor prospects. TNC also generates many inquiries through its excellent real estate gifts website.  (I recommend it to all my clients: http://giftplanning.nature.org/giftguide/)

Though some institutions have generated gifts through mailings highlighting the story of actual real estate donors, the trend seems to be greater results from web pages that specifically highlight real estate as an asset to be donated. But the one trend that tops them all is the success of those development shops that focus prospect research on real estate donors, and then encourage (or require) their trained gift officers to initiate real estate conversations with prospects.

What is your advice to other non-profits interested in ramping up their real estate gift activity?

The themes that emerge from our collective experience are:

  1. Seek professional help in developing real estate gift acceptance policies and procedures appropriate for your organization.
  2. Find a combination of in-house staff eager to be trained, and outside consultants, who can evaluate gift opportunities, structure and close the gifts.
  3. Make sure that all staff and board members fully understand the organization’s interest in real estate gifts, and that they feel comfortable at least starting the discussion with donors when appropriate.
  4. Be patient. Understand that an investment of time and money will be necessary, but that with patience it will pay off in the form of substantial real estate gifts.

And finally, as a reminder that organizations that follow these practices are successful in attracting real estate gifts, a national survey of almost 600 non-profits conducted by the National Committee on Planned Giving (now the Partnership for Philanthropic Planning) in 2008, revealed that 13% of survey respondents – virtually all of which employed the steps outlined above – reported that 10% or greater of their total giving in recent years had been in the form of real estate gifts.

The Buy vs. Lease Decision

October 7, 2010

I am a fan of the work of the Nonprofit Finance Fund.  Through consulting services, financing, and advocacy, they help all sorts of nonprofit organizations stay in financial balance, so that they’re able to successfully adapt to changing financial circumstances — in both good and bad economic times — and grow and innovate when they’re ready.

Recently, an executive of NFF told me that it was his organization’s experience in recent years that of the nonprofits reporting financial distress of some sort, fully 95% of those financially troubled organizations had real estate ownership problems at the core of their financial difficulties.

For example, a nonprofit was given a property for their use, but didn’t anticipate the long term costs and hassles of property ownership. Or perhaps a nonprofit mounted a capital campaign for acquiring a headquarters building, not fully understanding the impact on their operating budget of the operations, maintenance and capital improvements required over the years.

Too seldom, in my experience, do nonprofits take a hard analytical look at the true costs, advantages and disadvantages, of the buy vs. rent decision.  Too many nonprofits tie their hands through long term ownership, rather than staying nimble through property leases. Too many nonprofits, in my opinion, wind up with way too much of their capital in a fixed real estate investment, when they’d be better off with more of that capital in cash reserves and endowment.

I recently was asked by The Cancer Connection, a wonderful nonprofit here in Northampton, to help them consider the possibility of mounting a capital campaign for the purpose of buying a facility to replace the leased space they had outgrown. As we worked it through, their board became convinced that they were in the business of providing services to individuals and families affected by cancer, not in the business of owning and managing real estate. We then proceeded to find suitable space, negotiate a long term lease, and launch a campaign to raise the money necessary for various leasehold improvements.  The result? Cancer Connection is in larger, better suited space, they raised all the money necessary to pay for improvements, and their cash reserves have remained intact, available for operating purposes and program expansion, not tied up in property ownership.

IRS Study Documents Increase in Real Estate Gifts

October 1, 2010

Starting with Tax Year 2003 the IRS has been producing reports called “Individual Noncash Charitable Contributions.”  IRS researchers have examined Form 8283 (Noncash Charitable Contributions) used to substantiate charitable deductions greater than $500 claimed on Schedule A (Itemized Deductions) of Form 1040.

In the spring of 2010 such a study was issued for the Tax Year 2007.  Here is a quick comparison of key real estate gift data from Tax year 2005 vs. Tax Year 2007.

What does this mean?

I think it means that in the middle of the decade the idea of real estate giving was grabbing hold.  Total real estate giving increased by over 30% during this period, with an especially dramatic increase (261%!) in the average size of the gift for donors 65 years and older.  This is especially significant, as a very high percentage of real estate giving comes from these older donors.

I predict that we will see a continuation of this trend once the IRS issues its report for Tax Year 2009.

When development officers tell me that real estate gifts are time consuming, sometimes complicated, and that some are pursued without ever making it to completion, I agree with all of this. But I point out: If the size of the gift is likely to be in the range of $400,000 or $500,000 or more, isn’t it worth a little investment of time and resources? Explain to me how this is a poor return on investment?

Here’s a link to the complete IRS Report: http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-soi/10sprbulindcont07.pdf

Growing Non-Profit Attention to Real Estate Gifts

November 23, 2009

I attended a recent meeting of the Planned Giving Group of New England in Boston. It was “Real Estate Theme Day” at PGGNE, with presentations on real estate gifts by a team from the University of Pennsylvania, and by Harry Estroff, Real Estate Gift Manager at The Nature Conservancy. Coincidentally, on the same day, my colleague Chase Magnuson was presenting on real estate gifts at the National Capital Gift Planning Council in Washington, DC. Chase joined the development staff at George Washington University to develop a comprehensive real estate gifts program for the University, drawing on his background as founder and principal of Real Estate For Charities.

In February, I’ll be presenting at PGGNE on Real Estate Gift Basics.  I’ve also been asked to make presentations on real estate gifts in the coming months at the Chicago Planned Giving Council, the Minnesota Planned Giving Council, and the Greater Cincinnati Planned Giving Council.

Why all the attention to real estate gifts?

Here’s my short list of reasons that development offices across the country are turning more of their attention to real estate gifts:

  1. There is growing awareness of the dramatic success of some real estate gift programs. For example, The Nature Conservancy has generated $300 million in real estate gifts (this doesn’t include gifts of conservation land) since 1982.
  2. Some charitably –minded donors want to proceed with plans to make gifts, but are cash-strapped and don’t have much in the way of appreciated securities, so are turning to the real estate portion of their balance sheets to make gifts.
  3. More and more property owners, particularly aging property owners, are finding the continued ownership, management and carrying costs of property – especially second, third or fourth homes – are more burdensome than enjoyable. They are thus quite interested in ways of disposing of their property with as little hassle as possible.
  4. Some property owners are wary of the process of marketing their properties in volatile times. They are therefore more inclined to gift the property, letting the charity undertake the marketing process.
  5. More financial advisors, as well as gift planners, have become knowledgeable of the range of real estate gift structures and how they can be helpful in addressing the retirement planning, estate planning, and charitable objectives of the families they work with.

Real Estate Gifts: Why, and How, to Pursue Their Largely Untapped Potential in Difficult Economic Times

July 23, 2009

As the effects of the deteriorating economy ripple through development offices of non-profit organizations of all sizes and shapes, increasing attention is being paid to the potential of real estate gifts. This shift in attention is due to several factors:

  • With growing liquidity concerns in most households, cash gifts – current or deferred – are becoming harder and harder to come by. This is causing development professionals to turn more of their attention to the non-cash assets of their donors and prospects, particularly real estate assets.
  • Real estate assets comprise over 35% of the assets of U.S. households. Yet only about 3% of charitable giving in recent years has come from real estate gifts. Development offices are increasingly recognizing the need to go where the wealth is – the largely untapped potential of real estate.
  • More attention is being paid to the experience of those non-profits that have consistently attracted large numbers of substantial real estate gifts. A survey conducted by the National Committee on Planned Giving, published in the Fall 2008 issue of The Journal of Gift Planning, reported that 13% of institutions responding received over 10% of their total contributions as real estate gifts over the previous three years, as measured in dollars.
  • The collective experience of institutions that have enjoyed success in pursuit of real estate gifts has led to an increasingly accepted body of “best practices” that permit the opening of the doors to real estate gifts while carefully managing and minimizing the potential risks of real estate.
  • Institutions at one stage or another of campaigns – planning phase, quiet phase, or those that have gone public and are concerned about hitting their targets – are increasingly turning their attention to the potential of real estate gifts. Indeed, there is evidence that the methodology for many campaign planning/feasibility studies in the future will devote more explicit attention to the role of real estate gifts in campaigns.

    Read more…

Making the Right Real Estate Gifts Happen

July 14, 2009

More and more non-profits are becoming aware that they are receiving fewer real estate gifts than some of their peers. They are realizing that other organizations have enjoyed considerable success in attracting a portion of the estimated 30 percent of the nation’s private wealth that is in real estate holdings.

In some cases, these organizations have responded by transitioning from a program that occasionally accepts gifts of real estate in various forms, to one that seeks to make such gifts happen. This transition needs to occur, of course, while taking appropriate precautions to manage the various types of risk (environmental, liquidity, holding cost) associated with owning real estate.

A review of the experience of those non-profits that have successfully made this transition reveals several important steps in developing a more active and lucrative real estate gifts program.

Get the key players on the same page

Successful programs tend to have clear gift acceptance policies and procedures governing real estate. These policies assure that everyone in the institution is on the same page regarding the types of properties (residential, commercial, farms and ranches, etc.) that will be accepted and the gift structures (CRTs, CGAs, retained life estates, etc.) that can be employed. These policies also tend to establish minimum gift amounts that take into account the often time-consuming and costly process of structuring, analyzing, and closing gifts of real estate.

Read more…